The Triple Crown is over, Big Brown is now back on Winstrol, and Curlin is expected to take care of business in the Grade 1 Stephen Foster today.

Now what?

While it outwardly appears that all of Curlin’s connections are on the same page, maybe cracks are beginning to show in the Big Brown camp.

For now, and probably for the rest of the season, Kent Desormeaux is Big Brown’s present and future rider, barring a repeat of the Belmont Stakes strategy scenario. Then all bets are off.

Edgar Prado, who invited Rick Dutrow’s wrath for his Preakness race-ride, is still, in Dutrow’s words, his “man.” But, like Bud Delp said of Bill Shoemaker, Bob Frieze is just a phone call away. Desormeaux, however, is Michael Iavarone’s man.

Tangentially, a question for Iavarone. You hired Gary Stevens as a consultant on all things Big Brown, so please settle this for me. Was Stevens hired to possibly confer with Desormeaux on pre-race strategy, or to throw him under the bus after the fact?

Disappointed minds would really like to know.

The barn’s post-Belmont game plan was to run in the Travers and Breeders’ Cup Classic. Now the owner is talking about a Travers prep, the $1 million Haskell, which works, of course. Iavarone also talked about how the Monmouth Park surface probably would be to Big Brown’s loving.

There was no mention of a purse boost, or an “appearance fee,” something which is included in the past performance lines of New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority management. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, despite the creepiness.

But Dutrow said he’d prefer to train Big Brown up to the Travers. With the Triple Crown over, Dutrow wants him on the kind of schedule that works for all Dutrow‘s horses, and it might serve Big Brown better, too.

It could be that Iavarone is erring on the side of the Benjamins here. Nothing wrong with that, either.

Outside of the barn and its connections, Curlin’s post-Foster schedule is still very much up in the air. The Louisville Courier Journal reported this week that Steve Asmussen wants no part of synthetic track racing for Curlin.

Not only is the trainer entitled, but good for him. Asmussen would rather have Curlin make his turf debut in Paris for $6 million than run for $5 million on whatever that stuff is at Santa Anita.

Knowing this to be the case, I asked Iavarone before the Belmont whether he’d consider laying this challenge down to the Curlin folks: Forget about having Paris, guys. If you want to run on grass, let’s meet in the Breeders’ Cup Turf. The Derby winner defeating an older Horse of the Year on grass might even add to Brownie’s breeding value. Given the correlation between Polytrack success on turf, maybe breeders would seek out Big Brown’s progeny because that offspring might have a reasonable chance for success on three surfaces?

Iavarone said that the Classic has far more prestige, perhaps erring on the side of the Benjamins again. Remember, the schedule is Iavarone’s call, not Three Chimneys’.

Barbara Banke, wife of Curlin’s principal owner Jess Jackson, thinks of their horse as a potential international star. Beyond the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, they are said to be considering the Japan Cup, another big ticket item. They learned in Dubai that Curlin can win without Lasix, important in Japan, not so much in Europe where drug testing, it is said, can be a bit spotty.

The Breeders’ Cup Turf is the only place where Big Brown can meet Curlin in the United States with international implications. Jackson is a sportsman, otherwise Curlin would be retired. Taking Iavarone at his word, so is he, saying before the Belmont that Big Brown would have two more races.

So think about this, please? Three million, plus breeding bragging rights, beats the old sharp stick in the eye.