The Horse Race Insider is a privately owned magazine. All copyrights reserved. “Bet with your head, not over it.”

The Conscience of Thoroughbred Racing

IS AUNT PEARL SOME KIND OF FAKE EURO?

OK, that’s a joke people, but let’s stop and think: Aunt Pearl was bred in Ireland and was purchased at Tallersalls, the Keeneland Select of Europe, only older and timeless.

Second, she’s by Lope de Vega, the superstar European stud that’s just the biggest thing Over There right now and not doing badly over here, either.

And, finally, of all things, she has blazing speed. Who does she think she is, Newspaperofrecord? Clearly, you won’t see any flies of her mane.

Aunt Pearl will be the American favorite to win the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf. Whether she is the post time favorite depends on which fillies the Europeans ship over.

But, remember, they often keep the best of their babies at home, pointing for their own 2021 Derbies and Oaks. With a notable exception or two, the prime European racing season is over.

Aunt Pearl is exciting, there is no doubt. She got a away to an easy, pace-less lead to win her debut handily over ground with some cut in it at Churchill, a wet grass bias that often prevents ralliers to kick it into high gear.

But a funny thing happened in Wednesday’s Jessamine at Keeneland. Aunt Pearl turned it into another rout of her rivals but, unlike her debut, there was some known talent in this bunch and the turf was indeed firm.

Beneath Florent Geroux, Aunt Pearl laid down fractions of :22.28 and :46.65 over footing she enjoyed en route to a final clocking of 1:40.86 for 1-1/16 miles, shattering the stakes mark of 1:42.21.

That’s some fancy steppin’ right there, even if there was a long runup to the timing pole helping to produce those rapid fractions.

Only Spanish Loveaffair got close enough, 2-1/2 lengths, to be included in serious Juvenile Fillies Turf win conversations, especially since Wednesday’s performance came over the 2020 Breeders’ Cup course. Ingrassia finished up nicely enough for third.

Spanish Loveraffair made a winning effort but this filly of Brad Cox, a man who knows how to win Breeders’ Cups with females of all ages, can now run her right out of her stall.

On an ordinary Wednesday in October, Aunt Pearl turned this Grade 2 for young fillies into a special treat.

Share on facebook
Facebook Share
Share on twitter
Twitter Share
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn Share
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

⚠ Before you comment

Our staff likes nothing better than to engage with the HRI Faithful and provide a forum for interaction on horseracing and sports. In that spirit, please be kind and reasonable; keep the language clean, and the tone civil. Comments from those who cannot comply will be deleted. Thank you.

4 Responses

  1. JP, I went to Tattersalls online and saw results of their select sale which just ended. Yes, Lope de Vega had two bay colts sell for 450,000 and 400,000 respectively (must be British lbs, huh?). Galileo (IRE) had two bay fillies sell, hold onto your hat, for 3,400,000 and 2,800,000 respectively. John, as a novice I am wondering if the fillies were bought for what they may be able to produce as broodmares a few years down the road or for what they may be able to win on the track. I guess it’s both. This whole breeding game is fascinating, a real puzzle as to what makes for good offspring. We know that ordinary mares have produced champion children so it is mysterious in a way. Someone told me that the mare makes the class. This Galileo must’ve been some kind of super horse.

    1. Speaking of breeding, Newswriter wrote about Asmussen and mentioned MB (Midnight Bisou) and Breeders’ Cup. All other reports say she has retired from racing and is going to a sale in November. Dr. Larry Bramladge discovered a fractured sesamoid in a front leg but said it did not require surgery. She’s done racing, ‘tho.

  2. Thanks for sharing all of this. Indeed, Lope is hot right now but Galileo? I could see buying those fillies for racing and residual value as broodmares though that’s rare unless a breeder has a specific cross he’s interested in. They are not afraid to race colts often over there and Galileo is dominant and they run up the side of mountains- super classy!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *